a bat, a ball, and thou

The Bee and I went out into the backyard today and practiced baseball. We couldn’t find the bat, so we just used a cardboard tube. In my first at-bat, I hit the ball so hard that the tube broke, which the Bee found hilariously funny. We fixed it with some strapping tape, and headed back out into the yard, where she ‘beat’ me, 12 to 5.
I hate exercise, but the one thing I can’t do is have my kids grow up knowing that. The down side of being a lifelong reader is that I find it really hard to motivate myself to exercise, because it’s just so damn boring. I’ve never been able to read while exercising, and I find that so incredibly disappointing that I almost never do any.

I struggle to find ways to exercise with my kids, so that they will think of it as something important and fun. It’s hard, since I don’t find it fun at all, but I don’t want them to know that. And it’s more fun to play with my kids than to ride on the exercycle, or do wretched exercise tapes. I tried to get the Bee interested in doing yoga at one point, but it didn’t really work out.

It’s funny, because my dad was one of the original runners. Before people ran, before jogging was a common form of exercise, my dad was a runner. My dad always ran in the morning, before he went to school. He’d get up at like 4 a.m., put on his clothes (including some amazing ensembles in the winter), and run for miles. My dad always went to work really early, but on weekends, he’d run later, and he’d come back when we were all sitting at the kitchen table, eating breakfast. He’d be all sweaty, no matter the temperature. In the winter sometimes he’d have icicles on his mustache.

All of my brothers were distance runners, but I was only ever a sprinter. An early case of asthma kept me from cross-country (and just might have something to do with my lifelong aversion to exercise), but I was decent at the 50- and 100-yard dashes (yes, they still measured in yards, back in the day). I did a lot of field events, particularly the long jump. As a kid, I played softball and basketball, and my brothers played soccer.

I’m thinking about asking the Bee if she wants to play tee-ball this spring. It’s only a matter of time till she’s actually better than me, and she might as well use that to her advantage.

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February 19, 2006. random other things.

9 Comments

  1. moonface replied:

    In a previous life, I used to really enjoy running – especially at dawn. Now it’s just too boring – and after two minutes I’m breathless anyway.

  2. brettdl replied:

    What irony. I just postedon running, too.

  3. Suzanne replied:

    I’ve been wondering the same thing — how can I inculcate a love for exercising in my children when I am utterly sloth-like? It’s especially hard in the winter; I don’t like going outside when it’s cold, so it’s an easy excuse to stay in and vegitate.

  4. Jon replied:

    Exercise…maybe just do it with them. I’m sloth like as well…but plan to get it moving when my lil one is older and exercise with me…might make for a bonding time or something…but the key is to start early i would think.

    – Jon
    – Daddy Detective
    http://www.daddydetective.com

  5. Vicky (Desperate to be a Housewife) replied:

    I would love to LOVE running, but my body doesn’t like it the same as my mind does. After a block, I’m struggling.

    I like to take the kids out for bike rides or sometimes we go out to the school field and kick a soccer ball around. Bella also likes walking, so at least I have a companion for that.

    Glad you’re encouraging the Bee to do something athletic. They don’t get enough of it in school anymore. We used to have gym 4-5 times a week and now my kids have it once a week. It’s not enough.

  6. chip replied:

    watch out for tball it can be very boring for 5 year olds… BK was on a tball team and not only was it boring but the coach assumed all the kids knew baseball inside out — BK didn’t and the coach wasn’t quite sure what to do. Remember these are 5 year olds! If there’s a pee wee soccer league that has a good,noncompetitive philosophy that might be a good start. BK loved just running around in a pack like a puppy and he eventually figured out about ball being important too.

  7. Jessica replied:

    I hate exercising, too. That’s why I’m so glad I found Tae Kwon Do. I get great exercise but I don’t feel like it’s exercise-there’s actually a point to doing sit ups in class. And I’m glad that my 5 year old is taking it with me because she gets to see me in a totally different situation. She sees me trying to learn new things and getting corrected by the instructor. And she gets great exercise too.

  8. Trasherati replied:

    Exercise is painful and boring, but mostly I object because one has to do it FOREVER. I’ve often said that if you told me to exercise for six months and I’d be in great health/shape and then I’d never have to do it again? I’d be an exercising MACHINE for six months.
    It’s the whole you-have-to-do-it-EVERY-DAY-until-you-DIE-ANYWAY part that I hate.
    Good for you for faking it and setting the example, LM. I let my husband do that for our boys : )

  9. chichimama replied:

    I have turned to my new best friend, the local Y, and enrolled both kids in many, many sports programs, a different one each semester until I hit upon one they seem to like. While I know it would be better to take us all out hiking and such, well, I don’t hike. So I have delegated exercise to the professionals. And I agree with the PP, Tball seems to bore C to tears. He much prefered swimming and gymnastics (I don’t actually overprogram my kids, I swear).

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